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The Welfare of mammals in zoos


Author:
National Agricultural Library (U.S.)
Source:
USDA
Year:
0000
Subject:
Animal welfare, Moral and ethical aspects, Captive wild animals, Breeding, Zoo animals, and bibliography
Abstract:
When director of the New York Zoological Park William T. Hornaday wrote "It is well that all visitors should know, that all net profits realized in the Park go directly toward the increase of the animal collections.", there were 177 species of mammals represented by 625 individuals at the park (Hornaday, 1906, p. 2). The early zoos of the U.S. raced to collect as vast an array of species as possible giving the public a chance to view animals they had only heard of or read about. Hornaday made no secret of the lack of knowledge necessary to keep exotic mammals alive. "Fame awaits the man who can discover a bill of fare on which Howling Monkeys, Sakis and Yerkees can live in captivity to adolescence, and repay their cost and care." (Hornaday, 1906, p.20) Nevertheless, "So far as the available supply of captive primates will permit, these typical species will constantly be kept on exhibition, together with many others equally interesting." (Hornaday, 1906, p. 15).
Format:
1 electronic resource (20 pages)
Language:
English
Publisher:
National Agricultural Library (U.S.)
Collection:
NAL Information Centers Collection
Permanent URL:
https://handle.nal.usda.gov/10113/7114207