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Enzyme resistant carbohydrate based micro-scale materials from sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) pulp for food and pharmaceutical applications

Permanent URL:
http://handle.nal.usda.gov/10113/58848
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Abstract:
Bio-based micro scale materials are increasingly used in functional food and pharmaceutical applications. The present study produced carbohydrate-based micro scale tubular materials from sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) pulp (SBP), a by-product of sugar beet processing. The isolated carbohydrates were composed of 84% non-sucrose carbohydrates and small amount of fat (13.0%), protein (1.2%), and ash (0.9%). These highly pure carbohydrates were used to prepare micro scale materials. Microscale tubular structures with lengths ranging from 22.5 ± 0.9 µm and cavities of the tubules ranging from 3.9 ± 1.2 µm were observed through Scanning electron microscope (SEM) and field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM). The stability of these micro scale tubular materials was studied by dissolution and digestion studies. The degrees of dissolution under simulated stomach and intestine conditions were 45-56% and 45-58%, respectively. The pancreatic enzymatic digestion with a-amylase and amyloglucosidase was 34.1%. In addition the X-ray diffraction showed the presence of A type structures, which represents the susceptibility of the materials for enzyme digestion. Furthermore, the material was thermally stable up to 133 C (exothermic peak) with a distinct endothermic peak at 60 C. Overall, the results clearly showed that the micro scale materials can be produced from non-sucrose fraction of sugar beet pulp; this material can be incorporated in food and pharmaceutical applications as encapsulating or packaging materials.
Author(s):
Nilushni Sivapragasam , Pushparajah Thavarajah , Jae-Bom Ohm , Dil Thavarajah
Note:
USDA Scientist Submission
Source:
Bioactive Carbohydrates and Dietary Fibre 2014 v.3
Language:
English
Year:
2014
Collection:
Journal Articles, USDA Authors, Peer-Reviewed
Rights:
Works produced by employees of the U.S. Government as part of their official duties are not copyrighted within the U.S. The content of this document is not copyrighted.