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Element pool changes within a scrub-oak ecosystem after 11 years of elevated CO2 exposure

Permanent URL:
http://handle.nal.usda.gov/10113/57038
File:
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Abstract:
The effects of elevated CO2 on ecosystem element stocks are equivocal, in part because cumulative effects of CO2 on element pools are difficult to detect. We conducted a complete above and belowground inventory of non-nitrogen macro- and micronutrient stocks in a subtropical woodland exposed to twice-ambient CO2 concentrations for 11 years. We analyzed a suite of nutrient elements and metals important for nutrient cycling in soils to a depth of ~2 m, in leaves and stems of the dominant oaks, in fine and coarse roots, and in litter. In conjunction with large biomass stimulation, elevated CO2 increased oak stem stocks of Na, Mg, P, K, V, Zn and Mo, and the aboveground pool of K and S. Elevated CO2 increased root pools of most elements, except Zn. CO2-stimulation of plant Ca was larger than the decline in the extractable Ca pool in soils, whereas for other elements, increased plant uptake matched the decline in the extractable pool in soil. We conclude that elevated CO2 caused a net transfer of a subset of nutrients from soil to plants, suggesting that ecosystems with a positive plant growth response under high CO2 will likely cause mobilization of elements from soil pools to plant biomass.
Author(s):
Benjamin D. Duval , Paul Dijkstra , Bert G. Drake , Dale W. Johnson , Michael E. Ketterer , J. Patrick Megonigal , Bruce A. Hungate
Subject(s):
Quercus , calcium , carbon dioxide , ecosystems , elevated atmospheric gases , leaves , magnesium , molybdenum , nutrient content , nutrient uptake , phosphorus , plant litter , plant response , potassium , roots , sodium , soil depth , soil nutrients , stems , sulfur , vanadium , woodlands , zinc
Source:
Plos One 2013 v.8 no.5
Language:
English
Year:
2013
Collection:
Journal Articles, USDA Authors, Peer-Reviewed
Rights:
Works produced by employees of the U.S. Government as part of their official duties are not copyrighted within the U.S. The content of this document is not copyrighted.