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High-fat diet-induced juvenile obesity leads to cardiomyocyte dysfunction and upregulation of Foxo3a transcription factor independent of lipotoxicity and apoptosis

Permanent URL:
http://handle.nal.usda.gov/10113/46673
File:
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Abstract:
Background: Obesity is associated with dyslipidemia, which leads to elevated triglyceride and ceramide levels, apoptosis and compromised cardiac function. Methods: To determine the role of high-fat diet-induced obesity on cardiomyocyte function, weanling male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed diets incorporating 10% of kcal or 45% of kcal from fat. Mechanical function of ventricular myocytes was evaluated including peak shortening (PS), time-to-PS (TPS), time-to-90% relengthening (TR90) and maximal velocity of shortening and relengthening (+/- dl/dt). Intracellular Ca2+ properties were assessed using fluorescent microscopy. Results: High-fat diet induced hyperinsulinemic insulin-resistant obesity with depressed PS, +/- dl/dt, prolonged TPS/TR90 reduced intracellular Ca2+ release and Ca2+ clearing rate in the absence of hypertension, diabetes, lipotoxicity and apoptosis. Myocyte responsiveness to increased stimulus frequency and extracellular Ca2+ was compromised. SERCA2a and phospholamban levels were increased, whereas phosphorylated phospholamban and potassium channel (Kv1,2) were reduced in high-fat diet group. High-fat diet upregulated the forkhead transcription factor Foxo3a, and suppressed mitochondrial aconitase activity without affecting expression of the caloric sensitive gene silent information regulator 2 (Sir2), protein nitrotyrosine formation, lipid peroxidation and apoptosis. Levels of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (NOS), inducible NOS, triglycerides and ceramide were similar between the two groups. Conclusions: Collectively, our data show that high-fat diet-induced obesity resulted in impaired cardiomyocyte function, upregulated Foxo3a transcription factor and mitochondrial damage without overt lipotoxicity or apoptosis.
Author(s):
Relling, David P. , Esberg, Lucy B. , Fang, Cindy X. , Johnson, W. Thomas , Murphy, Eric J. , Carlson, Edward C. , Saari, Jack T. , Ren, Jun
Subject(s):
high fat diet , obesity , myocytes , heart ventricle , gene expression , gene expression regulation , transcription factors , genes , cardiac output , calcium , cytochemistry , ion transport , young animals , rats
Format:
p. 549-561.
Note:
Includes references
Source:
Journal of hypertension 2006 Mar., v. 24, no. 3
Language:
English
Year:
2006
Collection:
Journal Articles, USDA Authors, Peer-Reviewed
Rights:
Works produced by employees of the U.S. Government as part of their official duties are not copyrighted within the U.S. The content of this document is not copyrighted.