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The genomic organization of plant pathogenicity in Fusarium species

Permanent URL:
http://handle.nal.usda.gov/10113/45784
File:
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Abstract:
Comparative genomics is a powerful tool to infer the molecular basis of fungal pathogenicity and its evolution by identifying differences in gene content and genomic organization between fungi with different hosts or modes of infection. Through comparative analysis, pathogenicity-related chromosomes have been identified in Fusarium oxysporum and Fusarium solani that contain genes for host-specific virulence. Lateral transfer of pathogenicity chromosomes, inferred from genomic data, now has been experimentally confirmed. Likewise, comparative genomics reveals the evolutionary relationships among toxin gene clusters whereby the loss and gain of genes from the cluster may be understood in an evolutionary context of toxin diversification. The genomic milieu of effector genes, encoding small secreted proteins, also suggests mechanisms that promote genetic diversification for the benefit of the pathogen.
Author(s):
Rep, Martijn , Kistler, H Corby
Subject(s):
Fusarium , plant pathogenic fungi , pathogenicity , genomics , transposons , mycotoxins , multigene family , fungal diseases of plants , pathotypes , microbial genetics , nucleotide sequences , genes , chromosomes , sequence analysis , genome , evolution , host specificity , literature reviews
Format:
p. 420-426.
Note:
In the special issue: Biotic interactions / edited by Jane E. Parker and Jeffrey G. Ellis.
Source:
Current opinion in plant biology 2010 Aug. 1, v. 13, no. 4
Language:
English
Publisher:
[Oxford, UK]: Pergamon: Elsevier Science
Year:
2010
Collection:
Journal Articles, USDA Authors, Peer-Reviewed
Rights:
Works produced by employees of the U.S. Government as part of their official duties are not copyrighted within the U.S. The content of this document is not copyrighted.