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Characterization of sesame (Sesamum indicum L.) germplasm regenerated in Georgia, USA

Permanent URL:
http://handle.nal.usda.gov/10113/44306
Abstract:
Sesame, Sesamum indicum L. is used worldwide for cooking oil and food. The United States Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, Plant Genetic Resources Conservation Unit (USDA, ARS, PGRCU) conserves 1,226 accessions originating from Europe, Africa, Asia, North America, and South America. Sesame accessions were directly seeded to the field in Griffin, GA between 15 May and 01 June 2003-2007. At 50% maturity, 192 accessions were characterized for morphological, phenological, and reproductive traits during the regeneration cycles. High quality plants regenerated from all accessions produced 131 to more than 80,000 seeds per accession. Sesame can be successfully grown and regenerated in Griffin, GA. Coefficients of variation and principal component analysis revealed considerable variability among accessions for phenological, morphological and reproductive traits. Assuming appropriate levels of heritability, sufficient variation among sesame accessions exists for days to maturity, plant height, and reproductive traits among these sesame accessions to warrant breeding programs for new sesame cultivar development.
Author(s):
Morris, J.B.
Subject(s):
Sesamum indicum , germplasm , provenance , plant morphology , phenology , reproductive traits , seed productivity , principal component analysis , plant genetic resources , stems , height , color , Georgia , Europe , Africa , Asia , North America , South America
Format:
p. 925-936.
Note:
Includes references
Source:
Genetic resources and crop evolution 2009 Nov., v. 56, no. 7
Language:
English
Publisher:
Dordrecht : Springer Netherlands
Year:
2009
Collection:
Journal Articles, USDA Authors, Peer-Reviewed
File:
Download [PDF File]
Rights:
Works produced by employees of the U.S. Government as part of their official duties are not copyrighted within the U.S. The content of this document is not copyrighted.