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Evaluation of Phosphorus Source Coefficients as Predictors of Runoff Phosphorus Concentrations

Permanent URL:
http://handle.nal.usda.gov/10113/28477
Abstract:
Many states have adopted a P site index (PSI) as a risk assessment tool to determine when P-based nutrient management is required for a given agricultural field. Some PSIs use a weighting factor, the phosphorus source coefficient (PSC), to account for differences in P solubility between organic P sources. Information relating to appropriate values of PSC for various organic P sources is limited. The objectives of this study were to determine PSCs for organic P sources and to examine the relationship between PSCs and P concentrations measured in simulated rainfall runoff. An incubation study was used to calculate PSCs based on the extractability of P from organic P sources (separated and unseparated liquid dairy manure, digested dairy manure, dairy manure solids, poultry litter, and compost) relative to P from triple superphosphate fertilizer. The PSCs from the 14-d incubations were the best predictors of runoff P after 14 d soil equilibration in the runoff boxes. The values for iron-oxide strip phosphorus (FeO-P) PSC ranged from 78% for compost to 28% for poultry litter and were significantly related to runoff DR-P (r2 = 0.80***) and FeO-P (r2 = 0.76***) during the 14-d runoff event. Mehlich 3 PSCs ranged from 59% for compost to 30% for unseparated dairy manure and were better predictors of DR-P and FeO-P during the 56-d event (r2 = 0.73*** and 0.65***, respectively). The results of this study indicate that PSCs based on soil incubations may improve the ability of PSCs to predict the risk of runoff transport, particularly after manure incorporation.
Author(s):
Smith, Matt C. , White, John W. , Coale, Frank J.
Subject(s):
phosphorus , prediction , water pollution , animal manures , agricultural runoff , rainfall simulation , fertilizer application , solubility , agricultural soils , organic fertilizers , superphosphate , iron oxides , Maryland
Format:
p. 587-597.
Note:
Includes references
Source:
Journal of environmental quality 2009 Mar-Apr, v. 38, no. 2
Language:
English
Year:
2009
Collection:
Journal Articles, USDA Authors, Peer-Reviewed
File:
Download [PDF File]
Rights:
Works produced by employees of the U.S. Government as part of their official duties are not copyrighted within the U.S. The content of this document is not copyrighted.