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European starlings: a review of an invasive species with far-reaching impacts

Permanent URL:
http://handle.nal.usda.gov/10113/17532
Abstract:
The introduction of European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris) in New York City in 1890 and 1891 resulted in their permanent establishment in North America. The successful occupation of North America (and most other continents as well) has earned the starling a nomination in the Top 100 list of 'Worlds Worst' invaders. Pimentel et al. (2000) estimated that starling damage to agriculture crops in the United States was $800 million yearly, based on $5/ha damage. Starlings may spread infectious diseases that sicken humans and livestock, costing nearly $800 million in health treatment costs. Lastly, starlings perhaps have contributed to the decline of native cavity-nesting birds by usurping their nesting sites. We describe the life history of starlings, their economic impact on agriculture, and their potential role as vectors in spreading diseases to livestock and humans. We recommend that the database on migratory and local movements of starlings be augmented and that improved baits and baiting strategies be developed to reduce nuisance populations.
Author(s):
Linz, G.M. , Homan, H.J. , Gaukler, S.M. , Penry, L.B. , Bleier, W.J.
Subject(s):
Sturnus vulgaris , wild birds , invasive species , vertebrate pests , disease vectors , environmental impact , economic impact , wildlife damage management , North America
Format:
p. 378-386.
Note:
Includes references
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fort Collins, CO : USDA APHIS Wildlife Services, National Wildlife Research Center, 2007.
Year:
2007
Collection:
Journal Articles, USDA Authors, Peer-Reviewed
File:
Download [PDF File]
Rights:
Works produced by employees of the U.S. Government as part of their official duties are not copyrighted within the U.S. The content of this document is not copyrighted.