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Effect of antimicrobial agents on livestock waste emissions

Permanent URL:
http://handle.nal.usda.gov/10113/17413
Abstract:
Various antimicrobial agents were evaluated with the purpose of reducing the microbial fermentation in stored cattle waste and the resulting odor emissions. Duplicate sealed 2-L flasks with 500 ml waste slurry, with and without antimicrobial inhibitors, were used to measure the production of short-chain volatile fatty acids, lactate, and total fermentation gas over 27-30 days. A combination of chlorhexidine diacetate (2 mM), iodoacetate (2 mM), and α-pinene (3.8 mM) reduced gas production 80% (1000 ml to 200 ml) and total volatile fatty acid production 50% (145 mM to 72 mM). Pinene had little antimicrobial effect; rather, it served as an effective masking agent, giving the waste a less offensive odor. A combination of chlorhexidine diacetate and the deaminase inhibitor, diphenyliodonium chloride (1.3 mM) had a similar effect in reducing short-chain volatile fatty acid production (145 mM to 80 mM). It is concluded that a combination of antimicrobial agents may be useful in controlling odor emissions and conserving organic matter in livestock wastes, therefore providing a potentially more useful byproduct waste when used as plant fertilizer.
Author(s):
Varel, V.H. , Miller, D.N.
Subject(s):
beef cattle , cattle manure
Format:
p. 392-397.
Note:
Includes references
Source:
Current microbiology June 2000. v. 40 (6)
Language:
English
Year:
2000
Collection:
Journal Articles, USDA Authors, Peer-Reviewed
File:
Download [PDF File]
Rights:
Works produced by employees of the U.S. Government as part of their official duties are not copyrighted within the U.S. The content of this document is not copyrighted.